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Notes

[NI001] I visited the new Owen web site and it looks very nice, especially the photo of Evan's son. One correction... Greene County has an "E" on the end.
As to the hints of a connection that I mentioned, this is what I meant:
- Evan and Payton Owen (my line) appear on the same page in the 1830 census for Greene County, and John H. Owen (my line) is on the very next page.
- Evan, Susanna Owen (widow of John H., my line) and Wm. Goodwin (married to an Owen in my line) all appear on the same page in the 1840 census for Greene.
- In the 1850 census for Greene, my Wm. Goodwin is family #970, your Evan is #971 (with wife and six kids identified), my Susan(na) Owen is #974, all in Highland Township. Also, my other kinsman Foster Owen (#894) is in the same township, quite near to your Geo. B. Stalcup (#880). Other Owens in the same township include descendants of an Ephraim Owen - any idea how he fits in? One of his presumed sons is an Amos Owen who has a son named Lot Owen. A Lot Owen is buried in the same cemetery in Wayne County, Iowa, where my Owens from Greene County are buried. And, I understand that my John H. Owen and your Evan are buried in the same cemetery in Highland Twp. An awful lot of coincidences!
Owen is not exactly a rare surname, but it's not all that common either (especially without a final "S"), and it seems odd that there would be so many Owens in the same township and same county at that early time and that there would be no family connection at all. It's possible, but I'm hoping that they are related.
Anyway, I would like to stay in touch in the hope that we can either confirm a link between your Evan and my bunch, or discard that possibility once and for all and move on to other things.
For what it's worth, the photo of the son of Evan on your web site looks a lot like my grandfather, Murrel Richard Owen, except for the mustache. He was tall and lanky, and he had light blue eyes, and he started me on this obsessive hobby.
All for today. Rick Albright, Merced, CA

[NI002] I do Know that Priscilla Sanders Owen had a hand in starting the Presbyterian Church in Highland Township in Greene County.

[NI006] I assume you meant a bio on Charles Greene Owen and about all I know about him is as follows:

Born 6/11/1832. Moving from Indiana to Decatur IL where he leveled many of the streets. It was said that these first wood block and later brick streets were so smooth from his manhandled scraper and draft horses that they did not need any filling or extra work to finish.
He died 9/12/1913 is buried in Greenwood Cemetary (far, low hill near Sangamon River) next to his 2nd wife Angeline Harvey (born 4/28/1839, married 11/20/1864 and died 5/1/1925) who was said to be 1/8th Cherokee and also his son John Harvey Owen 1/8/1876-5/14/1910 who died at age 34.
His son, Roy Pearl Owen (b. 3/18/1880 d. 9/28/1955) and his wife Pearl Gebhart are buried in Decatur's Fairlawn Cemetary along with their sons, Ralph Durward Owen 5/4/1920 d. 1/27/1997 and Robert Dale Owen. Submitted by Ralph & Julie's son, William Robert Owen b. 10/16/1954 of Decatur IL.

[NI114] J. N. Jessup Account:

The Owen Family

My mother was Charlotte Owen, and for the information of those Owens
of Green County, Indiana, who are more or less directly connected with
the Jessup family, I have added here an outline of an "Owen Family Tree".
Most of this information was furnished by Mrs. Mary E. Owen Wood, Santa
Fe, N. M.

J. N. Jessup






Tradition says an Owen moved from Wales to London and became "blacksmith to the King". This is very indefinite. An effort I made through a geneological agency in London to trace the facts failed to produce any results. This Owen had at least three children, Evan, Polly and John Thomas. Evan and Polly lived and died in England. John Thomas Owen came to America with the army of Lord Cornwallis and surrendered at Yorktown. He then swore allegiance to the U. S. and served with the army to the close of the war. Was mustered out in North Carolina where he settled and died. He owned land and was a blacksmith.

His children were, Peyton, David, Thomas, Evan, John Hunter, Josiah, Polly and Elizabeth. Polly and Thomas died in N. C. Thomas had two children when he was killed at a house-raising. Polly married a Reese.

The others moved to Indiana. Evan and John Hunter entered land on White River, Green County, where they lived and died. Peyton moved to Missouri where he died. Elizabeth married a Mock and for second husband, a Goodwin. She died in Greenup, Illinois. Josiah married Polly Phillips, moved to Iowa, near Keokuk, where he died about 1875.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------
A woman (and cousin) in NC who is helping look for Thomas Owen's (and in-
laws') paper trail there has found some interesting bits and pieces that add
to the precious little we know about him.
The 1788 Surry County Claims records show Thomas Owen sought payment for
"making and putting on two pair handcuffs on John Williams and Robert Briggs."
And, from the same year, someone was appointed overseer on a road project that
"leads by William Jeans from forks roads near him to Thomas Owens shop." Both
these items seem to confirm the oral history about Thomas being a blacksmith,
and Thomas' presumed son David Owen m. Hulda Jeane(s) in Stokes in 1818, so
the Jeans above may have been her father or other kinsman.

Also found was mention of Thomas Owen in the 1793 and 1795 tax lists for
either Stokes or Surry, I'm not sure which.
She also found several land records and other records mentioning many Owen
in-law surnames, such as Longino, Phillips, Mock, Hunter and Sprinkle.
The woman helping me - her name is Kay - descends from the Scott line...
Polly Scott m. Thomas Owen Jr., presumed son of our Thomas, in Stokes in 1815.
Shall I just forward her raw findings to our full Owen List? She may not
want to join the List at this time as she already has plenty on her plate
without more e--mail, but I can ask her. What do you think?
Rick Albright, Merced, CA.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------
Sources:
- Caldwell County, MO, History, Vol. 1, 1985, entries on Payton Owen and Margaret Owen.
- Johnson County, IN, History, 1880, entry on Prof. David A. Owen.
- Biographical Memories of Greene Co., IN, and History of Greene and Sullivan Counties, IN, 18??, entries on at least two Owens, and I am told the entry on Solomon DIXON also gives a version of the Redcoat story.


-------------------------------------------Thomas Owen Will -------------------------------------------------------

State of North-Carolina, Stokes County.
Know all Men by these presents, that Mrs. Margaret Owens, Benjamin Hunter, William Welborne and David Hunter are held and firmly bound unto Matthew Moore Esquire, Chairman of said court, in the sum of one hundred pounds, current money, to be paid to the said Matthew Moore or his successors: To the which payment, well and truly to be made, we bind sourselves, our heirs, executors and administrators, joinly and severally, firmly by these presents. Sealed with our seals, and dated this 7th day of September Anno Dom. 1801.
The Condition of this obligation is such, that if the above-bounden Margaret Owens and Benjamin Hunter administrators of all and singular the goods and chattels, rights and credits of Thomas Owens decd. do make or cause to be made, a true and perfect inventory of all and singular the goods and chattels, rights and credits of the deceased, which have or shall come to the hands, knowledge or possession of the said Margaret and Benjamin or into the hands or possession of any person or persons for them; and the same so made, do exhibit, or cause to be exhibited into Stokes county court, within the time prescribed by law, after the date of these presents: And the same goods, chattels and credits, and all other the goods, chattels and credits of the deceased, at the time of his death, or which at any time hereafter shall come into the hands or possession of the said Margaret and Benjamin or into the hands of any other person or persons for them do well and truly administer according to law; and further do make , or cause to be made, a just and true account of their said administration , agreeable to law, after the date of these presents; And all the rest and residue of the said goods, chattels and credits, which shall be found remaining upon the said administrators account (the same being first allowed by the Governor and Council, superior or county court) shall deliver and pay unto such person or persons respectively as the same shall become due, persuant to the true intent and meaning of the act of the General Assembly in that case made and provided. And if it shall appear that any will or testament was made by the deceased, and the executor or executors therein named do exhibit the same in court, making request to have it allowed and approved of accordingly, is the said Margaret and Benhjamin above-bounden, being therrunto required, do render and deliver the said letters on administration (approbation of such testment being first hand and made in the said court) then this obligation to be void, otherwise to remain in full force and virtue. Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of:
Jo. Williams
Margaret Owen (her mark, a backward capital N)
Benjamin Hunter
David Hunter (his mark, an X).

The inventory is handwritten (scribbled, some might say), and it's quite faded in parts. Also, there's no real explanation with it. At the end, it says: "The foregoing is the Inventory of the Estate of Thos. Owens decd. Signed Margret owen, Benamin Hunter." But the signatures seem to be in the same script as the document, so probably this is a clerk's copy of the original.
The following (weird spellings included) are listed under "Margret owen," with ditto marks by each item, and the money value is pounds/shillings/pence (20S to the pound, 12P to the shilling):
1 set of black funnels (?) (value not legible).
Tools, (valued at) 5.6.0 (five pounds is a lot of money, hence a lot of tools).
1 hous (?), 5.10.0
1 bead (bed?), 0.10.6
1 bead, 0.6.0
1 bead, 0.10.0
1 table & chest, 0.10.0
They gears, plows & hous together, 0.6.0
They kitchen ware and plates, 0.8.0
to 3 chairs and wares and fork, 0.3.7
They two Wheals (spinning wheels?), 0.6.0
They pales (buckets), frots (pots?) and tub, 0,12.0
to 2 bottles Slate and weg (?) and trays, 0.3.0
to cooks flat oven dutch oven, 0.5.2
to they ax and Matick (mattock?) flesh fork and pot rack (butchering stuff?), 0.6.6
to half bushel Drawing--- & luking glass (mirror) & begom (?), 0.7.0
to 1 Sume warkun (?) bars and gears, 0.6.4
to 1 bul yearlin (bull yearling) and one Heffer, 2.5.6
John Hunter
to one Histry book, 0.7.0
This is an audit of sales of the Estate of Thos. owens Decd, Margret owen, Benjamin Hunter. The total value I get is 18 pounds, 8 shillings, 9 pence.
But there is a second sheet with no explanation. Perhaps carrying on the John Hunter list from above, but it does not say that. And no values are given. Perhaps it is a second version of the above list, it seems to be, but with different wording. I guess one is the inventory and one is the sold items.
It says:
1 set of black Smith tools
1 hors (or hous)
3 beds and beds steds
1 Chest
1 table
1 cottin Wheale
1 flax Wheale
Sum peuter (pewter)
Sum Chairs
3 irons pots
2 Heater pales
2 bottles
Sum yearthen Ware (earthern)
1 Sume Warkin bars and gears
2 Shovels plows and 1 Colter (?)
2 hoes and 1 ax
1 Matick
1 Woshen tub (washing)
1 flesh fork & apease of potrack
1 Slate to Sum few knives and forks
1 small bull & a small heffer
1 small luking glas
2 pare of trases (harness)
Sum few buks (books)
1 Trin Wade (?)
1 jack plow
1 flat oven
1 Dutch oven
1 Drawing nife
1 half bushel
1 Churn
1 beagum (?)
----------------
They Crop of Corn and foder
They Wheat and oats and potatoes and what hogs thare is the flax and Cottin nd two Cows and one Calf and one Mare.


------------------------------------- New message ---------------------------------------------------------------------

Here's another few facts from my Owen files. Thomas Owen(s), the ex-Redcoat, appears in the 1790 census for Stokes Co., NC. and the household members - they're not identified by name - are two males and four females. Thomas also appears in the 1800 census for Stokes (one year before his death). The unidentified householders are three females and seven males. These may include servants and in-laws, cousins, etc., but if you count discard the father and mother, the 1800 gender count matches perfectly with the oral tradition of six boys and two girls!
And, oddly enough, the 1810 census for neighboring Surry Co., NC, includes a household headed by an EVAN OWEN. The household is comprised of two females and five males. The oldest male is 45 or older, and the next oldest is under 16. The ages do not seem to fit the Evan of Greene Co., IN, but the name combination is certainly food for thought. Rick Albright, Merced, CA.

The following is from a letter my grandfather Murrel Richard Owen wrote to me in 1963, style conforms to original:
"Thomas Owen just had one brother & and I cant tell you his given name they were having his funeral as Thomas got on the boat to come to the U.S. to help England whip the U.S. after the war was over Thomas was sick & was afraid he would die on board boat So he stayed here till he was well, then he was afraid to go back to England they might call him a deserter. So he just stayed in the U.S. the older Owen Religion was Baptist

Rick Albright, Merced, CA.

Finally, I found an old letter that is undated and unsigned, but which seems
>to belong to an empty envelope postmarked 17 Jun 1980, from George R. Owen, 910
>W. Olrech Sp. 34, Rogers, Arkansas 72756.
> The letter says the writer is the son of Bennie S. Owen, has a daughter Virginia
>May Owen Graham and an Aunt Etta Owen, and it mentions me! My grandfather's mother
>was named Etta. So, I'm unsure of his exact relationship, and I have not seen the
>letter for many years, but, like your informant, he too calls the first ancestor
>John Thomas Owen. His history of the family follows the same course we have discussed,
>but he seems to have done a lot more guessing and wishing than real research. His
>list of possible children of the first Thomas, with dates and places supplied by
>him:
> John Hunter Owen, b. VA 1784.
> Evan Owen, b. VA 1787.
> Payton Owen, b.? 1789.
> Richard Felps Owen, b. NC 1793.
> Josiah Owen, b. NC 1795.
> Elizabeth Owen, b. NC 1800.
> Mary Owen, no record of birth but married in NC in 1826 (news to me, and he
>does not say to whom!).
> The writer must be long gone by now, so I just offer this at face value, no
>guarantees of authenticity.


A separate paper concerning the estate of Thomas Owen is dated September 1801
>in Stokes County. It is a court order saying that Edward Villars Harbin Esq., along
>with John Miller, Frederick Miller and Joseph Miller, freeholders, must "lay out
>and lot off to Margaret Owen widow and relict of Thomas Owens decd. one years support
>agreeable to Act of Assembly and make return to the next court." A second page,
>dated 12 Sep 1801, talks of corn, fodder, potatoes, hogs, flax, cotten and two
>cows and a calf and one mare.

Now, you asked about the actual death date for the original Thomas Owen. A 100
>pound bond was issued on 7 Sept. 1801 in Stokes Co., NC, naming Margaret Owen and
>Benjamin Hunter (her brother) administrators for the estate of Thomas Owen, deceased.
>Margaret, the widow, signed with her mark, a backward N. Benjamin Hunter signed
>"for real." Also mentioned were William Welborn (connection unknown) and David
>Hunter, another of Margaret's brothers. The actual inventory is attached, but is
>very hard to read. The widow's name is given as "Margrit owen" on this document,
>and her dead husband is given as "Thos owens." The value of the estate seems to
>be 18 pounds, 8 shillings and 9 pence. I can send more details on this, if you're
>interested. The quality of the inventory is so poor that I doubt a Xerox of a Xerox
>would be useful.

I just finished visiting the Halifax Co., VA, USGenWeb site, and there is a lengthy and very interest report on Cornwallis' campaign in NC and VA during 1781. He was in the Yadkin River area of NC in February of that year, and on the banks of the Dan River, across from Halifax that same month, when the American forces slipped through his fingers, just before Yorktown. Perhaps Thomas Owen's experiences in that part of NC led him to suggest that the Hunters move there from VA??? Also, the narrative lists Cornwallis' forces as King's Household Guards, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, Tarleton's Cavalry and Hessian troops.



One last message:
Here are the units under Cornwallis in the NC and VA campaign, and at Yorktown:
23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers (also at Long Island).
33rd West Riding Regiment (at Long Island).
71st Fraser's Highlanders Regiment.
7th Royal Fusiliers.
Pioneers
1st Reg. of Foot Guards (also at Long Island).
Tory and German regiments
Tarleton's British Legion (Tory cavalry).

[NI115] Finally, I rediscovered a regional map of NC that a local resident marked up for me some 15 years ago. The Hunter family (in-laws of the original Thomas Owen) lived along FRIES CREEK and YADKIN RIVER on the border between the OLD RICHMOND and VIENNA districts of what is today the western-most portion of Forsyth Co., NC. If you can find Tobaccoville and Pfafftown, draw two imaginary converging lines westward from those to spots and have them neet at the Yadkin, and there you are. The Vienna-Dozier Road passes nearby. John Hunter, father-in-law of Thomas Owen, is buried there. Some graves have normal markers, but his is carved into the trunk of a tree... just a small cross and "JH" and possibly a year, although it is hard to tell with the crinkled bark.

Margaret (Hunter) Owen, widow of the orignal Thomas, is buried with her son-in-law David Mock and some of his Mock relatives. That place is in the LEWISVILLE District of Forsyth County, the area directedly south of Vienna District, and within a westward bulge the county boundary makes. Highway 421 passes quite near the small family cemetery. I have a photo of Margaret's marker. There is none for Thomas Owen.
Just a reminder, Forsythe County was created from Stokes in 1849, after our bunch moved west, so they would have thought of themselves as being from Stokes (or Surry, the parent county of both Stokes and Forsyth).

Rick Albright, Merced, CA (kd6dkc@@aol.com)

[NI117]

"Payton and Rachel had thirteen children. They raised their family in an
atmosphere of strong religious and political convictions. They were active
in the M.E. Church South, and closely followed the principles of the
Democratic party. The Owen family was known to aid in the matters tending
to benefit the County, and its citizens, and were highly respected."

Vol I, Caldwell
County Historical Society - 1985

[NI118] Also, I have the marriage bond for his son and my direct heir, Josiah Owen,
>filed in Surry Co., NC, and dated 20 Mar 1820. Josiah Owen and John Phillips of
>Surry Co., bound themselves in the amount of 500 pounds to gurantee the marriage
>license between Josiah Owen and Polly Phillips. I cannot tell if Josiah Owen and
>John Phillips actually signed the paper, or if it's the clerk's handwriting, but
>I suspect it's legit. Josiah signed "Josiahowen" (no space).

[NI120] Elizabeth Harris
chlamy@@acpub.duke.edu

[NI126] Also, found original plat for John Hunter, Thomas Owen's father-in-law. He seems to have paid $50 for 200 acres in Surry County. The tract was surveyed for James Franklin on the waters of Free's Creek and adjoining land of Jono. Franklin. The survey was dated 14 Feb 1787.
That's all for now. Rick

The will of John Hunter, father of Thomas Owen's wife, written on 29 Jan 1803
>in Stokes County, bequeaths to his daughter "Margaret Owens widow five Shillings."
> So, the above is the supportive data for Thomas Owen being in Stokes County.

[NI153] Kristi Wainscott-Moen has more information on this family

[NI156] Did not marry

[NI165] Early records usually spell the name ELLROTH. By the late 18th century, ELROD appears to have been more usual.

John Teter Elrod was born ca. 1684. Sources disagree on whether he was from Hessen, Germany, or from Switzerland. "Johan Dider Elroot", wife and one child, also "Johan Willem Lergerseiler", wife and one child, all sailed from Rotterdam 15 July 1709.

Wilhelm Lerchenzeiler was the father, or possibly the brother, of John Teter's wife Maria Magdalena Lerchenzeiler. Both families settled initially in New Castle Co., Delaware, where they are listed as communicants in Holy Trinity Church. Maria Margaretha apparently died about 1721, and John Teter married again, to (probably) Sarah Wood Smith, daughter of Robert and Catherine Wood and widow of John Smith of Cecil Co. MD.

There is some question among Elrod researchers as to whether this is really his second wife's name, and when they married. Dr. Parker Elrod, who researched this family for many years, said that John Elrod and wife Maria M. were listed as communicants at Holy Trinity Lutheran Church from 1714-1719, but he appears alone in the 1720 communicant list.

The baptism of a child, George Arendt Elrod, one month old, is registered on 4 March 1722 with parents listed as John Teter and Sarah Elrod. Dr. Parker Elrod concluded that Maria Magdalena had died in 1721 at the birth of her son Christopher, and that George Arendt was the oldest child of the second marriage. No death record seems to have been found for her.\

The next baptism, of John Teter Elrod Jr., is registered in Lancaster Co. PA in 1733. Thus the family must have moved some time between 1722 and 1733, and it is possible that there were children born in this
interval whose birth and baptismal records have not been found.

Sources:

Records of the Moravians in North Carolina, 11 volumes; Publications of
the North Carolina Historical Commission.
Jurney, James, Ancestry of Alice Estelle and Effie Catherine Butner and
Related Families, privately printed, Bellevue WA, 1992

Forsyth Co. NC Cemetery Records

Abstracts of Wills and Estates Records of Rowan County, North Carolina
1753-1805 and Tax Lists of 1759 and 1778, copyright Jo White Linn 1980

Descendants of Stephen and Elizabeth Douthit Riddle of Rowan Co. NC,
compiled by Ann Ellis Sheek 1982; LDS film 6019018

Miscellaneous ELROD material from Dr. Parker Elrod and others,
accumulated from various sources, including Pauline Walters, 1971, The
Elrod Family and Related Families; The Elrod Family by B.H. Wainscot;
Hope NC Moravian archives; Anderson, The Douthit Family in America;
Douthit, Here Come the Douthits

Thanks also to Leontine Launer for information on this family.

[NI167] Adam Soelle (1700-1767) or Sell came from a Mennonite family who were early settlers in Germantown PA. By 1744 he was living with his wife Sarah at Conewago, York Co. PA.

They are believed to be the parents of Aaltje Soelle who married Christopher Elrod. Adam joined the Moravian congregation at Bethania in 1764, but subsequently moved to Maryland, where he died in 1767.

So far as we can determine this family was not related to that of George Soelle, the Moravian minister nd missionary.


Early Moravian Settlers,
http://www.erols.com/fmoran/sett5.htmlEarly Moravian Settlers, R-T

[NI186] Went with his father, Caleb, to Green County, Indiana, about 1818


JESSUP,MARY ANN(E) JOHN WESTLY SANDDERS 1813 1880 STOKES,NC
SANDERS,JOHN WESTLEY MARY ANN JESSUP 1808 1882 NC
SANDERS,JOHN WESTLEY MARY ANNE JESSUP 1809 1882 NC
http://www.kindredkonnections.com/

[NI187] My mother was Charlotte Owen, and for the information of those Owens
of Green County, Indiana, who are more or less directly connected with
the Jessup family, I have added here an outline of an "Owen Family Tree".
Most of this information was furnished by Mrs. Mary E. Owen Wood, Santa
Fe, N. M.

J. N. Jessup


Tradition says an Owen moved from Wales to London and became "blacksmith
to the King". This is very indefinite. An effort I made through
a geneological agency in London to trace the facts failed to produce any
results. This Owen had at least three children, Evan, Polly and John
Thomas. Evan and Polly lived and died in England. John Thomas
Owen came to America with the army of Lord Cornwallis and surrendered at
Yorktown. He then swore allegiance to the U. S. and served with the
army to the close of the war. Was mustered out in North Carolina
where he settled and died. He owned land and was a blacksmith.
His children were, Peyton, David, Thomas, Evan, John Hunter, Josiah, Polly
and Elizabeth. Polly and Thomas died in N. C. Thomas had two
children when he was killed at a house-raising. Polly married a Reese.
The others moved to Indiana. Evan and John Hunter entered land on
White River, Green County, where they lived and died. Peyton moved
to Missouri where he died. Elizabeth married a Mock and for second
husband, a Goodwin. She died in Greenup, Illinois. Josiah married
Polly Phillips, moved to Iowa, near Keokuk, where he died about 1875.

EVAN OWEN

Evan Owen. B. May 21, 1787, D. May 3, 1861. M. Priscilla Sanders.
B. Nov. 20, 1799. D. June 8,1862.
Children of Evan Owen:
1. Jackson. B. about 1821. D. by drowning when 11 years old.
2. Charlotte. B. Jan. 6, 1823. D. Feb. 18,1899. Married
Verlin Jessup, June 24, 1841. Verlin Jessup B. June 25, 1814.
D. Oct. 24, 1878. He was born in Surrey County, N. C. Went
with his father, Caleb, to Green County, Indiana, about 1818.
To them eleven children were born, all of whom lived to be grown.
Children of Charlotte Owen Jessup:
(1). Martha. B. May 8, 1842. D. July 25, 1929. M.
Peter Dayhuff, Mch. 18, 1860. Children: Laura. M. Kendall
Cassaday. One child, Mrs. Nasie Cassaday Curry, West Terre Haute,
Ind. Amanda. M. William Simms. Two children, Mable and
Maude. Rolla, M. and has one child, Harry. Fletcher.
Married and has four children.
(2). Fletcher C. B. May 30, 1844. D. Oct. 20, 1885.
M. Molly Hardin, Dec. 25, 1877. One child, Dot.
(3). Permelia. B. May 18, 1846. D. Aug. 10, 1866.
(4). John Wesley. B. July 15, 1848. D. May 23, 1893.
(5). Olive. B. Mch. 18, 1850 D. Feb. 6, 1917. M. John Cassaday.
Nov. 14, 1872. Children: Mayme, Verlin, Clyde and Grace.
(6). Priscilla. B. Mch 15, 1853. D. Jan. 21, 1899.
(7). Charles Franklin. B. Mch. 11, 1855. D. Aug. 7, 1924.
M. Alice Wilson, Jan. 26, 1878. Three children: Burton, Maud
and Josie.
(8). James. B. Mch. 13, 1858. M. Clara Smith, April 4,
1882. Children: Lotta, Verlin, Eva, Josephine and Andrew (deceased).
(9). Frederick L. B. July 12, 1860. D. June 12, 1901.
M. Fannie Cantwell, Sept. 30, 1885. Two children: Edith and
Fletcher.
(10). LillieL. B. Oct. 3, 1863. M. James T. Smith. One
child, Willis.
(11). Jasper Newton. B. Aug. 30, 1866. M. Mary Katherine
Morris. Oct. 14, 1890. Two children, Morris, B. Nov. 29, 1892,
and Mildred Kathering, B. Dec. 25, 1895. M. second time, Effie Azbell,
Aug. 30, 1898.

3. Martha, Dau Evan Owen. B. May 8, 1824. D. about
1902. M. Harvey Allen. Children: Ben, Evan, Jane, and
James.
4. Elizabeth. D. when four years old.
5. Celia. Died in infancy.
6. Wesley. Died when four years old.
7. Permelia. B. April 21, 1830. M. Richard Beam.
Children: Love, Emma, Fred, Charles and Hallie.
8. Charles. B. June 11, 1832. M. first, Rachel Jessup,
by whom he had three children, James, Eliza and Clara. Second marriage,
Angeline Harvey, by whom he had six children, Josie, John, Derwood, Roy,
Ralph and Thomas.
9. Haston. B. Apr. 21, 1834. D. May 26, 1907 M. Elizabeth
Reed. Children: Newton, Florence, Evan, Mattie, Fletcher, Elizabeth,
Merritt and Ida.
10. Joel. Died when 22 months old.
11. Josephine. B. Feb. 15, 1836. D. July 1, 1858.
M. "Tine" Calvert. Children: John Wesley (M. Mourning
E. Bland, his second cousin and stepsister to Mary E. Wood. Her mother
was Rachel Mock, daughter of Elizabeth Owen Mock Goodwin. Three children:
Truman, (M. Luna Owen, his third cousin). Luna's father was Ben Owen,
her great grandfather was Josiah Owen. Seond child, Stella, (M. John
Barge). Third child, Roscoe.
12. John. B. July 18, 1838. D. About May, 1907. M.
Ann Darrough. Children: Daniel, Wesley, Myrtle and John.

John Hunter Owen.
Children:
1. John G. He was the first white child born in Green County,
Indiana. Aug. 8, 1818. Died April 18, 1876. M. Margaret
(Peggy) Mock, his cousin, Oct. 9, 1845. Children: Thomas C.,
David, Susan, Margaret, Roxie, Emma and Stephen.
2. Thomas. M. Nan Miller, who afterward married John Milam,
and had two children, Link and Mary.
3. Armistead. M. Lucinda Danely. Children:
Sarah (M. Solomon Dixon), Mary E. (M. J. A. Wood), and Hugh A.
4. Evan. Died when about 24 years old at New Orleans.
5. Sallie. M. Hughey Allen, brother to Harvey Allen.

Josiah Owen. M. Mary Phillips.
Children:
(1). Wilson. M. B. Mch. 22,1829. M. Lucinda Miller
of Shelby County, Ky., Feb. 22, 1847. ### Children: Thomas
J., Nancy E., (M. John Bucher), Ben F. (M. Miss Bucher). Daughter
### Luna married Truman Calvert, son of John Wesley Calvert. David
A. and Joseph A. and Elizabeth, who M. Aden Bridge.
(2) Foster. M. Eliza Miller.
(3) John. Died when 14 years old.
(4) William. M. Emma Hicks, Died in Ill.

Elizabeth Owen. M. first a Mr. David Mock and second, a
Mr. Wm. Goodwin.
Children:
(1) Margaret (Peggy) Mock, M. John G. Owen. See children of John
G. Owen, above.
(2) Nancy, M. Calvert.
(3) Henry, M. Anna Kelly
(4) Mary. M. Harvey Oliphant, a preacher.
(5) Rachel. M. Simon Bland.
(6) Settie. M. Ferdinand Donzing.
(7) David. Died by train in Illinois.
There was one child by Mr. Goodwin, Lucinda.


Baber's history says "Old Uncle Evan Owen came from N. C. to Lost River
in Orange County, Indiana, in 1814. From there he moved to White
River in 1817. He brough apple seed and peach seed from N. C. and
planted out the first orchard in Highland Township, R Green County.

[NI190] Also, the same Stokes marriage records show a David Owen m. Hulda JEANE (page
>229) on 7 Sep 1818, with John HUNTER (!) as witness. A John HUNTER m. Besty JEANES
>(note the final "s" on this one) on 12 Jul 1812, with Mark Chilton as witness.
>This is probably the same Hunter and the the two Jeanes are likely siblings. This
>might be the David Owen you list as a son of the first Thomas and reportedly moved
>to Illinois,

[NI191] Thomas had two children when he was killed at a house-raising

The Stokes Co., NC, estate records include a file #CR090.508 for a Thomas Owen
(possible son of the first Thomas, based on your Aunt M.E. notes) who died in 1825.
A Leonard SCOTT was appointed guardian for the heirs of Thomas: Paton (Peyton?)
and Leonard Owen, and margin notes indicate there are several pages on this at
the NC state archives!

Also, an abstract from the Stokes County marriage bond book shows on page 229
>that a Thomas OWEN married a Polly SCOTT on 31 Jan 1815, witnessed by Thomas SPRINKLE.
>This would seem to be the Thomas and Polly you mentioned in relation to the house-raising
>accident. The number of kids matches, too. PS, in case you do any follow-up on
>this, Polly is usually short for Mary, so she might be listed both ways.

The Stokes Co., NC, estate records include a file #CR090.508 for a Thomas Owen
>(possible son of the first Thomas, based on your Aunt M.E. notes) who died in 1825.
>A Leonard SCOTT was appointed guardian for the heirs of Thomas: Paton (Peyton?)
>and Leonard Owen, and margin notes indicate there are several pages on this at
>the NC state archives

[NI192] The 1830 and 1840 Stokes censuses show no Polly Owen, but she may have moved
>back into her father's household, and I did not check for Leonard SCOTT. The 1850
>Stokes census does list a Polly Owen, 50, dwelling #17 of Peters Creek District.
>She has no husband, but there are six Owens ranging from 18 to 10 in her home.
>If they're her kids, it does not work, but they may be grandkids. She would have
>been 15 at the time of her marriage to Thomas Jr. There's no sign of the sons Paton
>and Leonard mentioned above, her nextdoor neighbors are #18, Lewis Owen, 30, and
>#19 Houser Owen, 37, both with families.

[NI195] JESSUP,MARY ANN(E) JOHN WESTLY SANDDERS 1813 1880 STOKES,NC
SANDERS,JOHN WESTLEY MARY ANN JESSUP 1808 1882 NC
SANDERS,JOHN WESTLEY MARY ANNE JESSUP 1809 1882 NC
http://www.kindredkonnections.com/

[NI277] Mourning E. Bland, his second cousin and stepsister to Mary E. Wood

[NI428] Josiah Owen b. 1846 and Josiah Owen b. 1843 (son of Payton and
Rachel) both enrolled 4 Aug 1864, at Kingston, MO, were mustered into
service 9 Sep 1864 to date 4 Aug 1864, at St. Joseph MO, Company H, 44th
MO Infantry and were both mustered out and honorably discharged as a
private and a sergeant 15 Aug 1865 at Benton Barracks MO

[NI438] Josiah Owen b. 1846 and Josiah Owen b. 1843 (son of Payton and
Rachel) both enrolled 4 Aug 1864, at Kingston, MO, were mustered into
service 9 Sep 1864 to date 4 Aug 1864, at St. Joseph MO, Company H, 44th
MO Infantry and were both mustered out and honorably discharged as a
private and a sergeant 15 Aug 1865 at Benton Barracks MO.

[NI444] Also, an abstract from the Stokes County marriage bond book shows on page 229
that a Thomas OWEN married a Polly SCOTT on 31 Jan 1815, witnessed by Thomas SPRINKLE.
This would seem to be the Thomas and Polly you mentioned in relation to the house-raising
accident. The number of kids matches, too. PS, in case you do any follow-up on
this, Polly is usually short for Mary, so she might be listed both ways.

[NI446] Peyton's will was written15 May 1896 and his will was probated 26 Aug 1896

[NI471] I just rediscovered a 1986 letter from a NC informant saying that THOMAS OWEN was listed as the witness for the marriage of David HUNTER and Dorcus SHELTON, which took place in Halifax Co., VA, 15 Mar 1787. David was a son of John and Rachel HUNTER and brother of Thomas OWEN's wife, Margaret.

I DO NOT have a copy of the actual record, just the informant's quote from it, and he is thought to be no longer living.

The Hunters supposedly lived on Coleman's Creek, he said, and it is thought that Mrs. Rachel Hunter was a Coleman. There was a Benedictus Coleman there, and Rachel named one of her sons Benedictus, not a common name, I'm sure you'll agree.

The same informant (Audie Hunter of Pfafftown, NC), also said the 1782 Virginia state census for Halifax County lists a John Hunter household with 13 inhabitants, and a Benedictus Coleman with six. John Hunter had 10 children, so adding that ten to the two parents, and including Thomas Owen, you get a total of 13. Of course, it is all circumstantial evidence, which I failed to follow up on because I thought Audie would do it. He said there were no Hunters in Halifax in 1790, which matches with their arrival in Surry/Stokes, NC.

It may mean nothing, but I thought I should share it so that the combined brain power of our group might produce something. Do any of you have access to resources for checking any of the above info?


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